Must-Have

Must-Have

Seabin Automated Rubbish Collector

04-Jan-2016

You know that trash floating around in the Great Lakes... those pop cans, granola wrappers and ziplock bags left to waste away in the water? What if you could easily clean up that rubbish with a simple device? 

The Seabin — an automated rubbish bin that catches floating rubbish, oil, fuel and detergents — is working to protect the earth's water. Seabin is designed for floating docks in marinas, private pontoons, inland waterways, residential lakes, harbors, waterways, ports and yacht clubs. They can even be fitted to super yachts and motor yachts. 

Here's how it works: 

  • •The Seabin is situated at the waters surface and is plumbed into a shore-based water pump on the dock. The water gets sucked into the Seabin, bringing all floating debris and floating liquids into the Seabin. Floating debris is caught inside the Seabin and the water then flows out through the bottom of the bin and up into the pump on the dock.

          • The water then flows through the pump, where there is the option of installing an oil/water separator, and clean water then flows back into the ocean. This process is constant, operating 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

          • Inside the Seabin there is a natural fiber “catch bag,” which collects all the floating debris. When this is full or near to full, the marina worker simply changes the catch bag with another one. The collected debris is then disposed of responsibly, the catch bag cleaned and now it is ready to swap again for the full one in the still operating Seabin.

          • The size of the Seabin and catch bag are designed for one person to safely change the catch bag.

          • If the Seabin is full it still works. The flow of the water simply pulls all the surrounding floating debris against the Seabin and keeps it there. The marina worker would simply scoop up the surrounding debris and then change the catch bag as normal.

          • For more information, and to stay up to date on the Seabin project, visit seabinproject.com





Manitowoc MAR1_2017